Quick Answer: When To Use Were Or Was?

When to use was or were examples?

As I said above, was and were are in the past tense, but they are used differently.

Was is used in the first person singular (I) and the third person singular (he, she, it).

Were is used in the second person singular and plural (you, your, yours) and first and third person plural (we, they).

I was driving to the park..

Why do we say if I were?

The reason we use WERE instead of WAS is because the sentence is in the SUBJUNCTIVE mood which is used for hypothetical situations. This is a condition which is contrary to fact or reality (the fact is, I am NOT you). In the subjunctive mood we use IF + I / HE / SHE / IT + WERE for the verb To Be.

What does the phrase as it were mean?

Used to indicate that a word or statement is perhaps not exact though practically right; as if it were so. Synonyms: so to speak, in a manner of speaking, in a way.

What are the rules for were and were?

Generally, “was is used for singular objects and “were” is used for plural objects. So, you will use “was” with I, he, she and it while you will use “were” with you, we and they. There is a tip you might want to consider. Even though you are singular, you must use “were”.

Is if always followed by were?

In both sentences above, the “if” clause contains a form of the past tense of the verb. There is one exception to this rule, however. If the verb in the if clause is “to be,” use “were,” even if the subject of the clause is a third person singular subject (i.e., he, she, it).

What’s the difference between were and we re?

“Were” is simply a plural past-tense form of the verb “are.” To talk about something happening now or in the future, use “we’re”; but to talk about something in the past, use “were.” If you can’t substitute “we are” for the word you’ve written, omit the apostrophe.

Had been Vs have been?

“Has been” and “have been” are both in the present perfect tense. “Has been” is used in the third-person singular and “have been” is used for first- and second-person singular and all plural uses. … “Had been” is the past perfect tense and is used in all cases, singular and plural.

Was already or had already been?

Both are correct, but you use “have already been” to talk about the present, and “had already been” to talk about a past event.

How do you use were in a sentence?

Were is a verb that’s the second person singular past, plural past, and past subjunctive of the verb “be.” For instance, “I was out last night,” becomes, “you were out last night,” or “they were out last night.” Also, “were” is pronounced different than “where” and “wear,” except when it’s used in the word “werewolf,” …

When to use have been or were?

Let us say ‘were’ is a representative of the past tense, and ‘have been’ a representative of the present perfect tense.

Can we say I were?

“I were” is subjunctive only; if you want to talk about the past, it’s “I was.” But if you wish you were, it’s “I wish I were.”

How do you use the word were?

Were is the past tense of be when used as a verb. Where means in a specific place when used as an adverb or conjunction. A good way to remember the difference is that where has an “h” for “home”, and home is a place. Out of the two words, “were” is the most common.

What tense is have been?

Present perfect progressive tense describes an action that began in the past, continues in the present, and may continue into the future. This tense is formed by using has/have been and the present participle of the verb (the verb form ending in -ing).

Which is correct grammatically correct if I was or if I were?

“I were” is called the subjunctive mood, and is used when you’re are talking about something that isn’t true or when you wish something was true. If she was feeling sick… <-- It is possible or probable that she was feeling sick. "I was" is for things that could have happened in the past or now.

Can I say if I were?

Many people use if I was and if I were interchangeably to describe a hypothetical situation. The confusion occurs because when writing in the past tense, I was is correct while I were is incorrect. However, when writing about non-realistic or hypothetical situations, if I were is the only correct choice.

Is it grammatically correct to say if I were you?

From my research online the correct way is to say “If I were you” and not “If I was you” because this is the “subjunctive mood”. However they don’t say the underlying reason for it. They just say use “If I were you” when it is subjunctive.

Is if I were a boy grammatically correct?

This is an example of the subjunctive mood in English, which is rare. We use it to state something that is contrary to fact. When she says “If I were a boy” she is actually a girl, so she is imagining she were a boy. It’s rare and many people would just say “If I was a boy,” which is technically wrong but common.

What does were mean?

Meaning – Were is the past tense of the verb are. Look at this example of were used in a sentence. In present tense, this sentence would say. Since were means the same as the past tense of are in this sentence, it is the correct word to use.